Typepad Master Class: Styling TypeLists

April 02, 2014

Welcome to the Typepad Master Class! If you've ever wanted to delve into more advanced trickery with your blog's design, the Master Class is for you. Topics covered in this series are for the adventurous or advanced blogger, so an intermediate to advanced level of knowledge of HTML and CSS will come in handy. Additionally, these guides will often require Custom CSS or Advanced Templates, so a Pro Unlimited account is necessary to access those areas and achieve the look and effects we cover. Interested in upgrading? Just head over to the Account link in your Dashboard and click on Billing Info to get started.

Features like TypeLists allow you to showcase a wide variety of content in your sidebar for readers to enjoy. Gone are the days when all TypeLists shared the same style, making custom styles complicated. Today, custom IDs are generated based on the title given to the TypeList, making styling a (relative) snap. Pretty genius, right?

With the unique identifier, you can use CSS to style each TypeList, and nearly all modules, using their custom ID or Class selector. It's easy to get started, easy to implement, and the only real difficulty you may face is coming up with the CSS for the styles you want.

Here are a couple of simple style options to get you started. Once you're comfortable with them, you can root around in your favorite design inspirations for ideas, use our tips and tricks articles in the Archives or in the Knowledge Base for CSS you can use, and so on. If there's anything you can't work out, just open a ticket at Help > New Ticket and we'll get you sorted.

Simple Header Changes

Font and Background Color

Style TypeList HeaderIn this example, we've changed the background color, font color, and font style, of a Links TypeList called "& You May Enjoy..." It originally looked like the two modules above it, but we really want to make this list pop to show them as featured items on the blog.

To make this change, we first had to locate the ID of the TypeList. As we mentioned earlier, every TypeList will have a custom ID assigned to it based on its title. To find exactly what the ID is, we simply use our browser to view the source of the blog (this is typically at View > Source or Page Source). Use your find command (Command+F or Alt+F) and search for the title of the Typelist. When we did this for the above TypeList in our example, our result looked like this:

image from content.screencast.com
We highlighted the ID so it's easier for you to take note of. Yours will look similar, except it will use your TypeList title (e.g. A TypeList called "Bloggers Unite" will appear as "bloggers_unite" or similar).

With this information in hand, we then scooted over to Design > Custom CSS and typed the following:

#_you_may_enjoy .module-header {
    color: #D9826E;
    background: #E5E5E5;
    font-style: italic;
    }

The above CSS indicates that we want to select the TypeList we found the ID for, then target specifically the header area, not its content. We then set a font and background color to match the style of the post titles. We also made sure to set the font style to italic so it stood out a bit more but kept with the style of the blog design. When doing something similar, you can choose your own font and background colors, not use a font style, add a border, background image--whatever you choose.

Simple Border Change

Continuing with the simple changes, but wanting to make the TypeList fit the design of the theme we've set, this next example mimics the navigation bar by implementing borders.

Simple Border Change

Back at Design > Custom CSS, we added the following:

#_you_may_enjoy .module-header {
    border-top: solid 5px #6B6662;
    border-bottom: solid 1px #C6C1BD;
    padding-top: 9px;
    padding-bottom: 9px;
    }

We again focused on the header of the TypeList, using the custom ID and Class selector to pinpoint where the style changes should be reflected. With a thick top border, a thinner bottom border, and some padding above and below the header title to make things vertically centered to match the navigation bar, we've got a slick, perhaps more subtle emphasis on the TypeList we want to feature.

Come up with a design boost for your sidebar content, then repeat the steps to locate the unique identifier for your TypeList, and work out the CSS you'll need to get to look the way you want. You can do quite a lot with a little inspiration, ambition enough to push your design to that next step, and some CSS. Don't try to make it more complex than it has to be, but if you find yourself in over your head, don't hesitate to reach out to us.

comments powered by Disqus

Welcome

Need help?

Follow us!

Typepad on FacebookTypepad on TwitterTypepad on Google+Typepad on PinterestSubscribe to Everything Typepad

Like us!

Typepad Newsletter

Still having trouble? Contact Support.